CTSI's impact

August 4, 2017

CTSI mentor Dr. Joe Gaugler looks at a book with his CTSI mentee Sierra TrostThree young researchers in our career development programs share how their CTSI mentors are helping them flourish.

April 24, 2017

Dental therapist treats a patient“CTSI’s support of our research has been an important part of our overarching efforts to influence policy decisions, advance the dental therapist profession, and better serve the communities who can benefit the most from these practitioners.”

- Dr. Karl Self, one of the two CTSI-supported University of Minnesota School of Dentistry researchers at the forefront of the emerging dental therapist profession.

March 29, 2017

HCMC researchers Dr. Mark Linzer and Sara PoplauWhat started as a one-off project blossomed into a standing CTSI-HCMC partnership with multiple grants and manuscripts.

HCMC researchers say CTSI’s biostatistical team "transformed" their statistical analysis in a way that helped result in funding, plus biostatisticians are supporting another project that's evaluating a unique Medicaid accountable care organization.

February 28, 2017

Sick child with momOne way CTSI and The Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium (PDIC) have teamed up to advance rare disease research is by supporting the efforts of Dr. Kyriakie Sarafoglou, as she explores better ways to help children with adrenal insufficiency.

Kids with this rare condition lack intrinsic steroid production, so simple childhood illnesses can cause them to get very sick and even become life-threatening. 

January 26, 2017

Greg Beilman and team conducting research in a lab“The Committee for Pharmaceutical Development infused new life into our treatment idea, and propelled it toward clinical trials. We would not be where we’re at now without its support.”

- U of M Professor Greg Beilman, MD, referring to a treatment that could help people survive severe blood loss

January 3, 2017

Healthy kids eating apples outsideA University of Minnesota research team found that early childhood care and education providers are making significant strides in ensuring kids eat healthy food and are physically active

Findings are from a follow-up survey to a 2010 study that was jointly funded by CTSI and the Institute for Clinical and Translational Research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. 

November 20, 2016

Rebecca Shlafer and Katy Kozhimannil“Our CTSI-supported research project didn’t just inform public policy; it led directly to the creation of new legislation,” says Dr. Rebecca Shlafer.

Fellow U of M faculty member Dr. Katy Kozhimannil adds, “CTSI support formalized our University-community partnership, which was critical to our ability to make a nationwide impact with our work."

October 26, 2016

nurse holding patient's hand“The protected time, training, mentorship, and support I received through CTSI’s KL2 Scholars Career Development Program has had a significant impact on my research career. CTSI’s support enabled me to secure an R01 grant to continue my research, which ultimately aims to improve quality of life for nursing home residents.”

- Dr. Tetyana Shippee of the School of Public Health

October 3, 2016

Ricky DeFoe addresses a packed room at Cloquet's Community Forum on Heroin and Opioid Abuse, sharing his experience in losing a daughter to a heroin overdose. Also pictured are co-panelists and Carlton County Drug Abuse Task Force members Richard Colsen, CTSI support enabled Assistant Professor Laura Palombi, PharmD, MPH, and a community task force to hold a CTSI-supported forum on heroin and opioid abuse that successfully rallied a northern Minnesota town.

Dr. Palombi credits CTSI as the "jump-start” that propelled everything forward, including subsequent funding to replicate best practices in other rural communities. 

September 28, 2016

Bioengineered blood vessels developed in a lab that someday could be used to transform childrens' heart surgeryUniversity of Minnesota biomedical engineers showed artificial blood vessels implanted in young lambs could grow within the new owner, potentially preventing the need for repeated surgeries in children with congenital heart defects. 

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